Collectors share their obsessions from tractors to Asian fine art in the WHAT DO YOU COLLECT? video. 

Quilts, submitted by Roderick K.

I collect unique, quirky and maverick quilts from c. 1950-2000.

Nutcrackers, submitted by Anita O.


This is my collection of nutcrackers that I display year round on my fireplace mantel. 

Nutcrackers, submitted by Anita O.

This is my collection of nutcrackers that I display year round on my fireplace mantel. 

Comic books, submitted by Mark M.


I am a collector of comic books. To be more specific, I collect mainly Spawn comics. Usually when I am out-of-town and spot a near by comic store, I’ll go in and ask if they have any back issues of the book. Stores usually have a stash of them somewhere. They’re a lot of fun to read and I think the artwork in them is just great. The book as progressed somewhere through issue 250, but my goal has just been issues 1-100. I’ve gotten to the point where I keep track in my phone of the issues I’m missing so I don’t mistakenly buy duplicates. I’ve probably been collecting them since I was around 11 years old. Kind of a fun thing to do. Somewhat dorky, but that’s OK.

Comic books, submitted by Mark M.

I am a collector of comic books. To be more specific, I collect mainly Spawn comics. Usually when I am out-of-town and spot a near by comic store, I’ll go in and ask if they have any back issues of the book. Stores usually have a stash of them somewhere. They’re a lot of fun to read and I think the artwork in them is just great. The book as progressed somewhere through issue 250, but my goal has just been issues 1-100. I’ve gotten to the point where I keep track in my phone of the issues I’m missing so I don’t mistakenly buy duplicates. I’ve probably been collecting them since I was around 11 years old. Kind of a fun thing to do. Somewhat dorky, but that’s OK.

Beer bottles, submitted by Ruth H.

My husband has collected beer bottles for over 30 years. The collection is quite large (over 3000 bottles), completely inventoried, and much, although not all, of the beer was consumed by him. He’ll take anything that had beer in it….

Attached are a few photos, one of the entire collection and the other of a few select Vermont beers.

Depression glass, submitted by Trudy F.

Like that of many collectors, my interest in Depression glass began after I received 2 sets of dishes from my mother. While searching for matching pieces, I became fascinated with the many patterns, colors, and variety of glassware that were produced during the period of the mid-1920’s through the 1940’s. I have been collecting for about 15 years and now have nearly 600 pieces representing about 50 different patterns.

My favorite pieces are those with intricate designs that were made using etched molds. In order to mimic etched glass, which was much more expensive to make, manufacturers produced glassware with raised designs that were created by acid-etched molds. A design would be cut into a layer of wax which would be applied to the surface of the mold, and acid was used to erode the areas of the mold that were not protected by the wax.  These molds were very expensive to produce, but they could each be used to produce thousands of pieces of glass. The pattern “Royal Lace,” shown in the picture with the blue and crystal pieces, is a good example of this.

I hope you enjoy seeing this small part of my collection!

Candy pillows, submitted by Jordan D.
I don’t know quite why I started collecting candy pillows, but I do intend to get them all. I’m currently hunting down a Mike and Ike pillow, along with several flavored Tootsie Rolls.

Candy pillows, submitted by Jordan D.

I don’t know quite why I started collecting candy pillows, but I do intend to get them all. I’m currently hunting down a Mike and Ike pillow, along with several flavored Tootsie Rolls.

Seashells, submitted by Jean B.

These are some of my Florida shells. Part of the challenge is trying to find the right way to display them.

Children’s potty chairs, submitted by Maggie J.
I collect antique wooden potty chairs! Here are two of my favorites. I use old fabrics to make removable seats.

Children’s potty chairs, submitted by Maggie J.

I collect antique wooden potty chairs! Here are two of my favorites. I use old fabrics to make removable seats.

Kuba cloth, submitted by Robert S.
I am an artist in New York City and collect Kuba cloth, a textile made by the Kuba people in the Congo. This is my most recent acquisition: Raffia cloth with fringed edges.
Cloth inside fringe: starting at top and then clockwise: 23 x 23.5 x 25.5 x 24”; including fringe: 25 x 25 x 26.25 x 27.5”

Kuba cloth, submitted by Robert S.

I am an artist in New York City and collect Kuba cloth, a textile made by the Kuba people in the Congo. This is my most recent acquisition: Raffia cloth with fringed edges.

Cloth inside fringe: starting at top and then clockwise: 23 x 23.5 x 25.5 x 24”; including fringe: 25 x 25 x 26.25 x 27.5”